QUESTIONNAIRE SUR UN PASSAGE DE « THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS » DE LEWIS CARROLL

 

Problématique : En quoi les mots participent-ils à la structure de notre imaginaire ?

 

Sources :

Lewis Carroll : extrait du chapitre VI de « Through the Looking Glass ».

Lewis Carroll traduit par Jacques Papy : Extrait de « De l’autre côté du miroir » (Folio classique n°2657, pp 274-278)

 

Texte

When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean— neither more nor less.’

The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master - - that’s all.’

 

scornful : méprisant, dédaigneux

 

 

Questions (répondez sous forme de phrase complète)

 

1)« - La question est de savoir si vous pouvez obliger les mots à vouloir dire des choses différentes. » (traduction de Jacques Papy) En quoi cette remarque d’Alice peut sembler étrange ?

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

2) Selon Alice, « la question est de savoir si » :

- un mot peut avoir plusieurs sens.

- on peut obliger les mots à vouloir dire autre chose que ce qu’ils veulent habituellement dire.

- on peut obliger les mots à ne rien vouloir dire.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Texte

Alice was too much puzzled to say anything, so after a minute Humpty Dumpty began again. ‘They’ve a temper, some of them— particularly verbs, they’re the proudest— adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs— however, I can manage the whole of them! Impenetrability! That’s what I say!’

 

puzzled : perplexe, étonnée, déconcerté ; « They’ve a temper » : Ils ont du caractère.

 

Questions (répondez sous forme de phrases complètes)

 

3) L’adjectif « orgueilleux » signifie :

- opinion exagérée qu’on a de sa valeur personnelle.

- que l’on aime l’or par-dessus tout.

- que l’on se moque de tout.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

 

4) Pourquoi, à votre avis, Humpty Dumpty affirme-t-il que les verbes sont les « plus orgueilleux » ; n’hésitez pas à proposer une réponse originale, le texte ne répondant pas lui-même à la question.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

5) Que pensez-vous de l’affirmation « however, I can manage the whole of them ! »  ? Que révèle-t-elle du caractère de Humpty Dumpty ?

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Texte

Would you tell me, please,’ said Alice ‘what that means?‘

Now you talk like a reasonable child,’ said Humpty Dumpty, looking very much pleased. ‘I meant by “impenetrability” that we’ve had enough of that subject, and it would be just as well if you’d mention what you mean to do next, as I suppose you don’t mean to stop here all the rest of your life.’

That’s a great deal to make one word mean,’ Alice said in a thoughtful tone.

When I make a word do a lot of work like that,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘I always pay it extra.’

Oh!’ said Alice. She was too much puzzled to make any other remark.

Ah, you should see ‘em come round me of a Saturday night,’ Humpty Dumpty went on, wagging his head gravely from side to side: ‘for to get their wages, you know.’

(Alice didn’t venture to ask what he paid them with; and so you see I can’t tell you.)

 

wagging his head : balançant sa tête ; for to get their wages : pour toucher leur salaire ; to venture : risquer, s’aventurer, oser.

 

Questions (répondez sous forme de phrases complètes)

 

6) Comment Humpty-Dumpty se sert-il du mot « impenetrability » ? Pourquoi à votre avis ?

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

7) La remarque « and so you see I can’t tell you » est :

- un proverbe.

- une note en bas de page.

- une intervention de l’auteur.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Texte :

You seem very clever at explaining words, Sir,’ said Alice. ‘Would you kindly tell me the meaning of the poem called “Jabberwocky”?’

Let’s hear it,’ said Humpty Dumpty. ‘I can explain all the poems that were ever invented— and a good many that haven’t been invented just yet.’

This sounded very hopeful, so Alice repeated the first verse

 

Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.

 

That’s enough to begin with,’ Humpty Dumpty interrupted: ‘there are plenty of hard words there. “brillig” means four o’clock in the afternoon— the time when you begin “broiling” things for dinner.’

That’ll do very well,’ said Alice: and “slithy”?’

Well, “slithy” means “lithe and slimy.” “Lithe” is the same as “active.” You see it’s like a portmanteau— there are two meanings packed up into one word.’

I see it now,’ Alice remarked thoughtfully: ‘and what are “toves”?’

Well, “toves’ are something like badgers— they’re something like lizards— and they’re something like corkscrews.’

They must be very curious looking creatures.’

They are that,’ said Humpty Dumpty: ‘also they make their nests under sun-dials— also they live on cheese.’

And what’s the “gyre” and to “gimble”?’

To “gyre” is to go round and round like a gyroscope. To “gimble” is to make holes like a gimblet.’

And “the wabe” is the grass-plot round a sun-dial, I suppose?’ said Alice, surprised at her own ingenuity.

Of course it is. It’s called “wabe,” you know, because it goes a long way before it, and a long way behind it— ’

And a long way beyond it on each side,’ Alice added.

Exactly so. Well, then, “mimsy” is “flimsy and miserable” (there’s another portmanteau for you). And a “borogove” is a thing shabby-looking bird with its feathers sticking out all round something like a live mop.’

And then “mome raths”?’ said Alice. ‘I’m afraid I’m giving you a great deal of trouble.’

Well, a “rath” is a sort of green pig: but “mome” I’m not certain about. I think it’s short for “from home”— meaning that they’d lost their way, you know.’

And what does “outgrabe” mean?’

Well, “outgribing” is something between bellowing and whistling, with a kind of sneeze in the middle: however, you’ll hear it done, maybe— down in the wood yonder— and when you’ve once heard it you’ll be quite content.

 

To broil : faire griller, mettre au four ; lithe : souple ; slimy : visqueux ; portmanteau : mot-valise ; badger : blaireau ; corkscrew : tire-bouchon ; sun-dial : cadran solaire ; gimblet : vrille ; grass-plot : Jacques Papy traduit par « allée » ; flimsy: fragile ; shabby : minable ; feathers : plumes ; mop : balai ; to bellow : beugler ; to whistle : siffler ; sneeze : éternuement ; to be quite content : être bien content, être très satisfait.

 

Questions (répondez sous forme de phrases complètes)

 

8) « Il était grilheure ; les slictueux toves

Gyraient sur l’alloinde et vriblaient ;

Tout flivoreux allaient les borogoves ;

Les verchons fourgus bourniflaient. »

(Traduction par Jacques Papy des vers récités par Alice)

 

En vous aidant du texte de Lewis Carroll et de la traduction ci-dessus de Jacques Papy, proposez en prose ou en vers une traduction en français courant de l’extrait du poème « Jabberwocky » cité par Alice.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

9) Le commentaire du poème que Gros Coco fait à la demande d’Alice nous apprend :

- que jamais aucun mot n’a de sens.

- que l’on peut jouer avec les mots.

- que le langage permet de décrire le monde réel et d’inventer des mondes imaginaires.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

10) Quand on dit : « j’ai quelque chose en tête » cela veut dire :

- que l’on pense à quelque chose.

- que l’on a quelque chose qui nous est entré dans la tête (par les oreilles par exemple).

- qu’on ne sait pas ce qu’on dit.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

11) Selon vous, le mot « arbre » est un signe unifiant :

- une forme sonore (le signifiant « arbre ») et l’idée (le signifié) d’ « arbre ».

- un nom (le nom « arbre ») et une chose qui est un « arbre ».

- une forme sonore et une idée qui n’a pas de sens.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

12) Selon vous, le mot « borogove » est un signe unifiant :

- une forme sonore (le son « borogove ») et l’idée (le concept) de « borogove».

- un nom (le nom « borogove ») et une chose qui est un « borogove».

- une forme sonore et une idée qui n’a pas de sens.

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

13) Selon vous, le mot « chwallaboucte » est un signe unifiant :

- une forme sonore (le son « chwallaboucte ») et l’idée (le concept) de « chwallaboucte ».

- un nom (le nom « chwallaboucte ») et une chose qui est un « chwallaboucte ».

- une forme sonore et une idée qui n’a pas de sens.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

14) En conclusion, nous pouvons dire :

- que les humains décident du sens de formes sonores que l’on appelle « mots ».

- que, grâce au langage, les humains peuvent structurer aussi bien la réalité que leur imaginaire.

- que les mots font ce qu’ils veulent et nous font dire n’importe quoi.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Patrice Houzeau

Hondeghem, le 3 janvier 2017.